Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Awesome History Sites

Paper on World War I due? Looking for inspiration from something other than your possibly (likely!) out-of-date school textbook or Wikipedia? These library e-resources and must-try websites are good supplements to the history topics being covered in the classroom.

For younger students...
  • America's Story - Brought to you by the Library of Congress, this site aims to "put the story back in history and show you some things that you've never heard or seen before." For example, discover what Abraham Lincoln had in his pockets on the night he was assassinated
  • BBC Schools Primary History  - Videos, games and activities for ages 4-11 covering a variety of historical topics
  • Britannica Library-Children - It's best to search for a specific historical topic (versus just "history,"), but users can access articles, videos, images and other related content. Content can be narrowed down by reading level (1-2-3). Access with your FCPL library card.
  • Kids InfoBits - Under Social Studies, younger students can browse through topics like Historical Figures, U.S. Presidents and more. Text can be read aloud. Access with your FCPL library card.
  • World Book Online for Kids - Children can explore "Important People" and "History and Government." For struggling readers, there is the option to hear the text read aloud. Access with your FCPL library card.
For older students...
  • Biography In Context - Get to know the people behind the historical events/social forces you're researching with this engaging database available to FCPL card holders. 
  • Britannica Library-Young Adults and/or Britannica Library-Reference Center - Access articles, videos, images, primary sources and e-books when you search for topics that span history. Like the Children's version, the results can be filtered by reading level. Access with your FCPL library card.
  • Crash Course - John Green...yes, "The Fault In Our Stars" John Green, is the star (and teacher) of online videos covering US History and World History. Green, along with his brother Hank, also have videos covering science and literature. 
  • Find It Virginia's U.S History Collection and World History Collection - Search hundreds of thousands of articles in scholarly journals not available on the Internet. Access with your FCPL library card.
  • Google Cultural Institute: Historic Moments - Check out online exhibits that feature art, videos, audio and text about significant historical people, places and events.
  • Literati - You can search a topic (i.e., World War I) and topic pages containing hand-curated e-reference materials, will bubble to the top of your results. If you don't have a topic yet, click/tap on the Find Topic Pages tab, Filter by Category "History" and explore numerous entries. Access with your FCPL library card.
  • Made From History - Features picture essays, timelines, videos, and interactive guides to significant events in European and World history, and Civil Rights, with additional topics such as the Civil War in the works.
  • National Archives: Online Exhibits - Students can use images and documents from the Digital Vault to create posters and videos to enhance research papers and presentations.
  • World Book Online Info Finder - Older students can access primary sources, e-books and encyclopedia content by searching specific subjects or browsing by subject "History" and then digging deeper into sub-topics such as Russia and Soviet Union, etc. Access with your FCPL library card.
Hopefully the above sites will get you started on your exploration of history and make the research portion of your history project more interesting. Remember too that your local library has loads of good books and videos, and friendly librarians to help you find what you need.

~ Alison, Electronic Resources Librarian

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Add the library's mobile catalog to your device's home screen

Your smartphone or tablet’s home screen isn’t just for apps -- you can also pin your favorite websites to your home screen so you can quickly access them.

The directions below explain how you can make the library's mobile catalog one of your home screen icons so that you can quickly log in/access your library account, search for items and place holds.

Android
For most browsers, open the website you want to pin. Tap the Menu button, tap the Page option, and then tap Add to Home Screen. If you're using the "Chrome for Android" browser, open the website or web page you want to pin to your home screen, tap the Menu button and tap Add to Home Screen (there is no Page option).

iPhone, iPad, & iPod Touch
In Safari, go to the website you want to add to your home screen. Tap the Share button on the browser’s toolbar — that’s the rectangle with an arrow pointing upward. It’s on the bar at the top of the screen on an iPad, and on the bar at the bottom of the screen on an iPhone or iPod Touch. Tap the Add to Home Screen icon in the Share menu (you’ll be prompted to name the shortcut before tapping the Add button).

If your device is something other than iOS or Android, open its web browser and look in its menu for an option named something like “Add to home screen” or “Pin to home screen.”

~ Alison, Electronic Resources Librarian

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Stay Safe Online

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month. With smartphone hacks and consumer data theft in the news, online security is always a timely topic.

If you're concerned about staying safe online, the following websites can help you learn about the issues and take steps to improve your security and privacy.

Guides to Online Safety

Online Privacy

Here are some ways to help protect your privacy from advertisers and others:
  • Fix Tracking - Suggestions for improving your Internet browser's privacy settings; click the arrows at the top to find instructions for your Internet browser
  • NAI Opt Out - Opt out of some online tracking from advertisers

Free Antivirus Software

If you don't have antivirus software, here are some free, highly-rated programs to consider:
Want to learn more about online privacy and security issues? You can borrow one of our nonfiction books on this topic.

Becky @ Warrenton

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

e-Resource of the Month: World Vital Records

Image courtesy of WorldVitalRecords.com
If you've ever done research on your family tree, you are probably familiar with the library's Ancestry Library database, which allows you to search for census records, birth records and much more. Because Ancestry Library can only be used inside Fauquier County Public Library's branch locations, we're pleased to now provide anywhere/anytime access to records through our newest database, World Vital Records.

World Vital Records includes the following features:
Image courtesy of WorldVitalRecords.com

  • Complete U.S. Census 1790-1940
  • Cemetery records
  • City directories
  • Yearbooks - high school, college and military
  • Historic U.S. maps - including landowner names
  • Ability to access records from home with your library card

The World Vital Records database must be accessed through the library's website (vs. direct link):

Image courtesy of WorldVitalRecords.com


~ Alison, Electronic Resources Librarian

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Hispanic Heritage Month

Hispanic Heritage Month runs September 15 through October 15.

Here are some online resources perfect for schoolwork or just for fun:

~Alison, Electronic Resources Librarian

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Happy Constitution Day, Citizenship Day


Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, observed annually on September 17, commemorate the signing of the Constitution on September 17, 1787, and “recognize all who, by coming of age or by naturalization, have become citizens.”

Learn more about the Constitution and our government with Constitution Day resources from the National Archives and Records Administration and the Library of Congress American Memory website.

Watch the Emmy Award-winning series, The Constitution: That Delicate Balance online via Annenberg Learner. Geared at high school-aged learners and above, key political, legal, and media professionals engage in spontaneous and heated debates on controversial issues such as campaign spending, the right to die, school prayer, and immigration reform.

Teachers and home school parents will want to check out the collection of lesson plans, educational games and interactive modules available on the National Endowment of the Humanities website, EDSITEment.

If you have an iPhone or iPad, you can get the Library of Congress' The U.S. Constitution: Analysis and Interpretation app, which delivers the full text of “Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation”; contains a clause-by-clause discussion of the entire Constitution; discusses all Supreme Court cases and selected historical documents relevant to interpreting the Constitution; lists all federal, state, and local laws struck down by the Supreme Court, and all cases where the Court overturned its prior precedent.

~ Alison, Electronic Resources Librarian

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Get Homework Help from the Library

Fall is the season of cooler weather, autumn landscapes, toasty-hot comfort foods... and homework. Never fear—the library has homework resources for learners of all ages.

Tackle Homework

Starting September 30, students in grades K–8 are invited to our Homework Help sessions.

On Tuesdays from 5–7 pm at the Bealeton Library, National Honor Society students from Liberty High School will help students with homework or class assignments.

Students in grades 3–12 can also get homework help from a teacher via our online homework help service from Literati. Teachers are available to help with reading, writing, and math. To get online homework help, visit Literati and log in with your 10-digit library card number. Click the black Homework Help tab on the right to get started.

Research an Assignment

Not sure where to start with your next assignment? We recommend the library's online collection of information sources for students. Unlike an Internet search, our online collection contains reliable sources selected by experts.

Visit our Articles & Databases page to get started. Our offerings include:
You will be prompted to log in with your 10-digit library card number.

For help choosing the best sources for your assignment, visit our Literati service and scroll down to watch videos about finding and evaluating sources.

Older students tackling a research paper should definitely visit the Purdue Online Writing Lab to learn how to write a paper and format a bibliography.

Need More Help?

If you need assistance using the library, our librarians are here to help.

To get assistance, visit a branch or contact us by phone or email.

Becky @ Warrenton

To learn more about the Fauquier County Public Library's collection, events or programs, visit us on Facebook, Twitter or online.